chap2answers


Homework Questions – Chapter 2

Homework Questions – Chapter 2

  1. The most common chart used on the water is:

    1. polyconic projection

    2. lambert projection

    3. gnomic projection

    4. mercator projection

    Ref: SG – Chapter 2 – Charts


  2. On a mercator chart all lines of:

    1. latitude and longitude are straight lines and intersect at 90°.

    2. longitude are curved.

    3. latitude are curved.

    4. a great circle route is straight.


    Ref: WN – Chapter 4, pg 24, Nautical Charts


  3. A chart datum identifies, by letter and numbers, the:

    1. depth of water in feet.

    2. range of tides.

    3. coordinate systems.

    4. country where projection was created.



    Ref: SG – Chapter 4, pg 24, Nautical Charts


  4. Height of objects are indicated using as a reference:

    1. mean high water ( sometimes mean higher high water ).

    2. mean low water ( sometimes mean lower low water).

    3. low water.

    4. sea level


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5, pg 58,Clearance Overhead


     

  5. A nautical chart shows detail of:

    1. data relating to the rise and fall of tides.

    2. detail features both above and below water.

    3. facilities available to the yachtsman.

    4. color and structure of lighthouse



    Ref: SG – Chapter 2, ¶ 4,  Charts



  6. Large scale charts show a:

    1. small area with no detail.

    2. Large area in small detail.

    3. small area in great detail

    4. large area in great detail.



    Ref: WN – Chapter 4, pgs 27,28 – Scales


  7. The labels for charted beacons and buoys are:

    1. beacons vertical, buoys vertical

    2. beacons slanted, buoys slanted.

    3. beacons slanted, buoys vertical.

    4. beacons vertical, buoys slanted.



    Ref: SG – Chapter 2, ¶ 72,73, Beacons vs. Buoys


  8. A lubber line is:

    1. a fixed directional line on the compass.

    2. an index on the compass card.

    3. attached to the keel.

    4. used to determine compass variation.



    Ref: WN – Ch 4, pg 47, Ship’s Compass




  9. Variation is the angular distance between:

    1. compass and true north.

    2. magnetic north and true north.

    3. compass and geographic north.

    4. boat’s meridian and true north.



    Ref:’ SG – Chapter 2, ¶ 104-106, Magnetic vs. True North


  10. Fill in the missing blanks in the following table

 

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

True Direction (T)

347º

122º

062º

237º

004º

Local Variation (V)

11ºE

13ºW

5ºE

14ºW

10ºE

Magnetic Direction (M)

336º

135º

057º

251º

354º

Ref: SG – Ch 2, pgs
36-37, TVM

 

  1. A fathom is:

    1. 3 feet


    2. 6 feet

    3. 9 feet

    4. 12 feet


    Ref: SG – Chapter 2, ¶ 18 Depth Contours


  2. The starboard side of a channel when returning from sea is marked with:

    1. green color – cylindrical (can) – odd numbers

    2. red color – cylindrical (can) – odd numbers

    3. green color – conical (can) – even numbers


    4. red color – conical (nun) – even numbers


    Ref: SG – Chapter 2. pg 17, Aids to Navigation


  3. A buoy marking the junction of two channels where the
    preferred course is to the left would be a _____ and would have a letter
    designation_____.

    1. green over red (horizontal) can

    2. red over green (horizontal) can


    3. red over green (horizontal) nun.

    4. green over red (horizontal) nun


    Ref: SG – Chapter 2. ¶ 28  -Lateral Preferred Channel Marks


  4. Measuring distance on a chart use the horizontal scale
    (longitude) at the top of the chart.

    1. True


    2. False


    Ref: WN – Chapter 4, pg 39, – Measuring Distance


  5. For a 3-D GPS fix you need:

    1. one satellite

    2. two satellites

    3. three satellites


    4. four satellites


    Ref: WN


    Chapter 4 , pg 48, GPS


  6. GPS provides you with:

    1. nearest boats to you.

    2. the weather.


    3. current position

    4. nearest facilities


    Ref: WN


    Chapter 4, pg 49, GPS

  7. A depth sounder uses a transducer to:

    1. provide direct measurement of
      height of tide above or below datum.

    2. identify your location.

    3. send acoustical sound downward through the water.
    4. identify the nearest navigational aid.

    Ref: WN – Chapter 4 – Depth Sounders