chap5answers


Homework Questions – Chapter 5

Homework Questions – Chapter 5

  1. GPS provides you with

    1. water depth.

    2. warning of hazards.

    3. your present position.

    4. weather information.


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5, ¶ 4- What GPS Does



  2. The Satellite Screen provides the user with information
    identifying satellites and their locations.

    1. True

    2. False


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 10.1- Satellite Screen



  3. Building a GPS route requires the use of

    1. local charts and maps only.

    2. NOAA Pilot Charts.

    3. a set of selected waypoints.

    4. a list of marinas.


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 – 31 – Constructing Routes



  4. Once a GPS route is in place it cannot be altered.

    1. True

    2. False

    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 – p.69 Entering Waypoints into your GPS


  5. Once a waypoint has been selected and activated for navigation, it is not
    necessary to refer to a chart because your course line is established.

    1. True

    2. False


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 38, 42; WN Ch 2 pg 7,
    Step 3 – Double Checking


  6. Waypoints should not be limited to places on the water.

    1. True

    2. False


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 22- Entering Landmarks as Waypoints



  7. The Map Screen and Highway Screen provide visual references of landmarks, rocks, etc.
    that are stored in your GPS.

    1. True

    2. False


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 10.3, 10.4 – Typical GPS Screens



  8. Once you activate a waypoint for navigation, you have to calculate the distance using 60D = ST.

    1. True

    2. False


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 27



  9. Since GPS is basically a chart, you need not plot your position on a chart if you are using GPS.

    1. True

    2. False



    Ref: SG


    Chapter 5 ¶ 11 – Typical GPS
    Screens


  10. GPS reports speed and course over ground.

    1. True

    2. False

    Ref: SG –
    Chapter 5  42, III C., D.,  – Navigating Using GPS and Waypoints , Fig 5-7



  11. When entering waypoints on a PC which is connected to a GPS, waypoints:

    1. can be entered directly from the PC.

    2. can be entered, but require software to work with GPS.

    3. cannot be entered on a moving boat.

    4. require a separate CRT.


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 pg. 71- Using a Computer



  12. When entering waypoints:

    1. it is best to let the GPS name them.

    2. you should name them with their latitude and longitude coordinates.

    3. you should try to name them according to geographic area and the object type.

    4. you should name them according to the current date and time.



    Ref: SG


    Chapter 5, ¶ 16 & 19 – Naming
    Waypoints


  13. It is a good practice to enter hazards as waypoints.

    1. True

    2. False


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 24 – Entering Hazards as Waypoints



  14. When you select a waypoint, the GPS:

    1. computes the bearing and distance to the waypoint.

    2. determines the hazards along the route.

    3. activates the related route.

    4. determines your course and speed over ground.


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5 ¶ 27 – What the GPS does when you select a Waypoint



  15. The process of GPS navigation can be thought of as
    planning, navigating, and:

    1. activating waypoints.

    2. selecting proper routes.

    3. avoiding obstacles.

    4. periodically double checking.


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 pg 55 – Planning with GPS and Paper Charts



  16. A recommended supplement to prequalifying route legs is to:

    1. label waypoints in the GPS

    2. mark isolated hazards on the chart.

    3. label course and reciprocals on the chart.

    4. mark course distances on the chart.


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 – Fig 5-2



  17. The depth datum on most NOAA charts is:

    1. MLLW

    2. MHW

    3. WGS-84

    4. MLW


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 pg 56 – Determining Safe Depths

     

  18. A good planning guideline for course width is:

    1. 5x boat length.

    2. 10x boat length.

    3. 200 feet to each side of center.

    4. 10x GPS accuracy


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 pg 58 – Horizontal Clearance 



  19. Bridge clearance marked on charts is most often based on:

    1. low tide.

    2. MHW.

    3. High tide.

    4. MLLW.


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 pg 58 – Overhead Clearance



  20. When converting from compass to true direction, you should:

    1. add east variation.

    2. subtract east deviation.

    3. consider deviation to be 0.

    4. add west variation.


    Ref: WN – Chapter 5 – Fig 5-20



  21. If your boat is at a complete stop, and you turn your
    boat around and face in a different direction, your GPS will show:

    1. magnetic north.

    2. the direction you are facing.

    3. true north.

    4. an undependable direction.


    Ref: SG – Chapter 5, ¶ 10.5