chap6answers


Homework Questions – Chapter 6

Homework Questions – Chapter 6

  1. GPS way points and navigational points of interest should

    1. only be marked on paper charts.

    2. be marked on your chart (digital or paper) for reference underway.

    3. only be entered on digital charts

    4. not be entered on a chart


    Ref: WN Chap 10 pg 129 intro



  2. Comparing visual observations with charted features:

    1. is only useful if your GPS has failed.

    2. contributes to safe navigation.

    3. is helpful only if your GPS is operational.

    4. is not necessary.


    Ref: WN Chap 10 pg 130



  3. GPS readout data should be:

    1. confirmed by another source.

    2. accepted even if inconsistent with your seaman’s eye observations.

    3. used even if GPS is considered to be suspect.

    4. used under all circumstances.


    WN Chap 10 pg 130 Quick Comparisons with the GPS



  4. Before plotting a relative bearing on a chart, it:

    1. must be converted.

    2. must be referenced to a waypoint.

    3. can be used as a compass bearing.

    4. can be plotted directly.


    WN Chap 10 – Bearings Using the Boat as a Reference



  5. When taking bearings, _________ bearings are generally the most accurate.

    1. bow

    2. compass

    3. relative

    4. true


    WN Chap 6 ¶34 –Bow Bearings



  6. Comparing your GPS reading to the compass bearing for the same landmark

    1. aids confidence in GPS indication

    2. confirms correct waypoint entry

    3. confirms your position

    4. confirms the current.


    WN Chap 10 – pg 130 – More Accurate Bearings

     

     

  7. Periodically plotting your bearing to a waypoint:

    1. confirms the GPS is working correctly.

    2. aids in verifying what is around you.

    3. is a check on your planned course.

    4. shows if the waypoint is out of position.



    WN Chap 10, pg 130-

    Comparing Your Bearing with a Chart


  8. A good way to sight an accurate bearing for comparison with the GPS readout is to:

    1. read over the compass

    2. steer the boat away from the point and read the compass.

    3. use a hand-bearing compass or compass binoculars.

    4. seaman’s eye.


    WN Chap 10 pg 130 – More Accurate Bearings



  9. For easiest comparison between compass and GPS bearings:

    1. use the outer compass rose on the chart.

    2. use the inner ring on the chart compass rose.

    3. convert with TVMDC.

    4. be sure to set the GPS to magnetic readings.


    WN Chap 10 – pg 131 Refresher – Converting between True and Magnetic



  10. A practical way to maintain a steady heading is to:

    1. steer by the compass.

    2. mentally average the course as the sea moves the boat.

    3. steer by the GPS.

    4. steer to a point identified on the horizon.


    WN Chap 11 – pg 132 – Headings



  11. If you want to measure an angle of about 4°, hold up at arms length:

    1. one finger.

    2. two fingers.

    3. three fingers.

    4. a closed fist.


    WN Chap 11 – pg 133 – It’s All in the Hands



  12. One of the most accurate means of establishing a line of position is with a:

    1. hand bearing compass.

    2. range.

    3. GPS waypoint.

    4. floating navigation aid.


    WN Chap 11- pg 133 – Ranges.



  13. To be useful for accurate navigation, a range:

    1. can be any two identifiable points.

    2. must be identified on the chart.

    3. should be entered as a waypoint.

    4. should be located near the waters edge.


    SG Chap 3 ¶52 – Ranges WN Chap 11 pg 135 – Relative Position of Landmarks



  14. A relative bearing is referenced to:

    1. a hand-bearing compass.

    2. True north.

    3. boat heading.

    4. a protractor.


    WN Chap 11 pg 136 – Relative Bearings

Figure A

Graphic No.

(1)

(2)

(3)

Rear Marker (higher)

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Rear Marker (lower)

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  1. Using Figure A above, when entering a channel you observe a range ahead as indicated in (1). You are:

    1. to the port of the preferred course line.

    2. on the preferred course line.

    3. to the starboard of the preferred course line.

    4. in the wrong channel.


    SG Chap 3 – Fig 3-6



  2. Using Figure A above, when entering a channel you observe a range ahead as indicated in (2). You are:

    1. to the port of the preferred course line.

    2. on the preferred course line.

    3. to the starboard of the preferred course line.

    4. in the wrong channel.


    SG Chap 3, Fig 3-6



  3. A boat to your port side is on a course to cross your path. The relative bearing
    to the other boat is numerically increasing.

    1. You will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    2. He will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    3. You must give way. Turn to starboard and/or slow down.

    4. He must give way. Be alert to his actions and prepare to act.


    SG Chap 6 ¶ 44 – Collision Course



  4. A boat to your starboard side is on a course to cross your path. The relative bearing
    to the other boat is numerically decreasing.

    1. You will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    2. He will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    3. You must give way. Turn to starboard and/or slow down.

    4. He must give way. Be alert to his actions and prepare to act.


    SG Chap 6 ¶ 44 – Collision Course



  5. A boat to your port side is on a course to cross your path. The relative bearing
    to the other boat is constant.

    1. You will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    2. He will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    3. You are on a collision course. You must give way. Turn to starboard and/or slow down.

    4. You are on a collision course. He must give way. Be alert to his actions and prepare to act if he does not.


    SG Chap 6 ¶ 44 – Collision Course



  6. A boat to your starboard side is on a course to cross your path. The relative bearing to the other boat is constant.

    1. You will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    2. He will pass ahead. Maintain course and speed, but be alert to any change.

    3. You are on a collision course. You must give way. Turn to starboard and/or slow down.

    4. You are on a collision course. He must give way. Be alert to his actions and prepare to act if he does not.


    SG Chap 6 ¶ 44 – Collision Course